Tori Avey http://toriavey.com Recipes & History - Inspired by our Delicious Past Fri, 06 May 2016 16:16:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.1 Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/05/mothers-day-brunch-recipes/ http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/05/mothers-day-brunch-recipes/#comments Fri, 06 May 2016 16:00:54 +0000 http://toriavey.com/?p=31373 A roundup of tasty and unique recipes for Mother's Day. Show Mom you care with a homemade breakfast in bed, or brunch!... Read More]]>

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes – A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch. 

In 1914 Woodrow Wilson signed the proclamation that made Mother’s Day a nationally recognized holiday. Since then, Mother’s Day has been celebrated each May, typically on the second Sunday. The idea of an American Mother’s Day came from Anna Jarvis, who, after her mother’s death in 1905, wanted a national holiday that would honor the sacrifices mothers make for their children. Anna’s mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, was a peace activist who offered her aid to all soldiers fighting in the Civil War, regardless of which side they fought on. Early on, Anna was able to organize several small-scale Mother’s Day church celebrations, but she wanted something bigger. After years of penning letters to newspapers and important politicians, President Wilson made her efforts worthwhile.

I may be biased, but I’ve always believed that food is one of the best gifts you can offer to somebody you love, especially when it’s homemade. With Mother’s Day this Sunday I can’t think of a better way to honor your mom than cooking something yummy for her… after all, she very likely spent a great deal of time in the kitchen cooking for you! On this special day, brunch seems like a great way to go. Instead of taking your mother out for a pricey meal, why not treat her to a few dishes you’ve made yourself? In hopes of inspiring all of you, I’ve gathered a few of my very favorite brunch recipes that are sure to leave mom feeling extra special… and maybe even a little impressed!

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Potato Crusted Spinach Frittata

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Maple Toasted Muesli

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Cinnamon Babka

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Poppy Seed Coffee Cake

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Lemon Lavender Iced Tea

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Pecan Rolls

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Chocolate Babka

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Tahini Waffles

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Nova Lox Benedict

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Coffee Cake Cupcakes

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Cheese Blintzes

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Smoked Salmon Goat Cheese Scramble

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Rosa Parks’ Peanut Butter Pancakes

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Bread and Butter Waffles

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Mushroom, Harissa and Goat Cheese Frittata

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Poppy Seed Pancakes

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Biscuits – Buttery or Dairy Free

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Vanilla Berry Sparkling Sangria

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Huevos Shakshukos

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Challah French Toast with Kahlua Coconut Crème

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Sriracha Seared Salmon Cakes

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Dark Chocolate Cherry Mandelbrot

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Sour Cream Coffeecake

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Crispy Baked Eggs

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Greek Yogurt Apple Streusel Cake

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Ree’s Lemon Blueberry Pancakes

Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes - A Roundup of Tasty and Inspiring Recipes. Show Mom How Much You Care With Homemade Brunch.

Peach Sangria

 

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What’s Happening in May http://toriavey.com/toris-corner/2016/05/whats-happening-in-may/ http://toriavey.com/toris-corner/2016/05/whats-happening-in-may/#respond Thu, 05 May 2016 03:19:45 +0000 http://toriavey.com/?p=39256 Celebrity birthdays, Mother's Day brunch recipes, Memorial Day cookout ideas and more!... Read More]]>

I just posted a new video to highlight all of the exciting things happening in May on ToriAvey.com! Subscribe to my YouTube channel for more exclusive updates and video content. What are you up to in May?

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History of the Mint Julep http://toriavey.com/history-kitchen/2016/05/history-of-the-mint-julep/ http://toriavey.com/history-kitchen/2016/05/history-of-the-mint-julep/#respond Wed, 04 May 2016 19:19:23 +0000 http://toriavey.com/?p=36348 A history of the mint julep cocktail, a favorite cocktail served each year at the Kentucky Derby.... Read More]]>

History of the Mint Julep

It is the very dream of drinks, the vision of sweet quaffings. The Bourbon and the mint are lovers. In the same land they live, on the same food they are fostered. The mint dips its infant leaf into the same stream that makes the bourbon what it is. The corn grows in the level lands through which small streams meander. By the brook-side the mint grows. As the little wavelets pass, they glide up to kiss the feet of the growing mint, the mint bends to salute them. Gracious and kind it is, living only for the sake of others. The crushing of it only makes its sweetness more apparent. Like a woman’s heart, it gives its sweetest aroma when bruised. Among the first to greet the spring, it comes. Beside the gurgling brooks that make music in the pastures it lives and thrives.

– J. Soule Smith, The Mint Julep: The Very Dream of Drinks, 1949

The mint julep, a cocktail made from a mixture of bourbon, powdered sugar, water and mint, is often associated with horse racing. It has been the official drink of the Kentucky Derby for almost a century; according to the website of the annual event, nearly 120,000 juleps are sold at Churchill Downs over the two-day race period. Like most recipes that come from the South, mint juleps have a long and often debated history. It’s widely believed that the name of the drink comes from the Persian word gulab and the Arab word julab, both of which translate to “rosewater.” The term julep was also used to refer to any type of syrupy mixed drink taken with medicine. As early as 1784, mint juleps were prescribed to soothe aching stomachs and help patients who had difficulty swallowing. A legend claims that the mint julep arrived in America when a man was searching near the Mississippi River for water to add to his bourbon. When he saw mint growing wild, he decided to drop a few leaves into his libation—ta da! Mint julep. This is almost certainly a wives’ tale, or as my friend Gil Marks called it, a bubbe meise; most historians agree that the mint julep was developed within Virginia high society during the late 1700s or early 1800s.

In its early days Virginians would sip on mint juleps, served in silver goblets, over breakfast. During this time they were made with brandy or rum. Some say bourbon, which was readily available, was introduced to the julep by poor Southerners who could not afford fine liquor. To this day, many enthusiasts insist that a proper julep should be made only with bourbon whiskey. Given that Bourbon County is the birthplace of bourbon whiskey, there is also a strong connection between the mint julep and the state of Kentucky. As early as 1816, silver julep cups were offered as prizes at Kentucky county fairs, early evidence of the state’s association with the famous cocktail. It’s unclear how exactly the mint julep became the star drink of the Kentucky Derby in 1938, but it comes as no surprise that this bourbon-centric cocktail is now celebrated as the beverage of choice at the state’s most famous event.

History of the Mint Julep

How the mint julep is made varies slightly from place to place and bartender to bartender. There is some controversy as to whether the mint leaves should be delicately mixed in or muddled to release a stronger flavor. And then, of course, there’s the whiskey question—must one really use bourbon to make a true mint julep? Minor quibbles aside, it’s no wonder that the mint julep rose to popularity in the South. What could be more refreshing than an iced mint beverage on a humid, sweltering summer day?

In an early recipe published in Dishes and Beverages of the Old South (1913), author Martha McCulloch-Williams offers a very lengthy and detailed method for creating a mint julep:

This requires the best of everything if you would have it in perfection. Especially the mint and the whiskey or brandy. Choose tender, quick-grown mint, leafy, not long-stalked and coarse, wash it very clean, taking care not to bruise it in the least, and lay in a clean cloth upon ice. Chill the spirits likewise. Put the sugar and water in a clean fruit jar, and set on ice. Do this at least six hours before serving so the sugar shall be fully dissolved. Four lumps to the large goblet is about right—with half a gobletful of fresh cold water. At serving time, rub a zest of lemon around the rim of each goblet—the goblets must be well chilled—then half fill with the dissolved sugar, add a tablespoonful of cracked ice, and stand sprigs of mint thickly all around the rim. Set the goblets in the tray, then fill up with whiskey or brandy or both, mixed—the mixture is best with brands that blend smoothly. Drop in the middle a fresh ripe strawberry, or cherry, or slice of red peach, and serve at once. Fruit can be left out without harm to flavor—it is mainly for the satisfaction of the eye. But never by any chance bruise the mint—it will give an acrid flavor “most tolerable and not to be endured.” To get the real old-time effect, serve with spoons in the goblets rather than straws. In dipping and sipping more of the mint-essence comes out—beside the clinking of the spoons is nearly as refreshing as the tinkle of the ice.

History of the Mint Julep

Image Source: Project Gutenberg

If you visit Churchill Downs for the Kentucky Derby and order a mint julep, you’ll receive a ready-to-serve cocktail made with Early Times Kentucky Whiskey, the official supplier of the cocktail for over 18 years. If you’re feeling extra fancy (and charitable), you can order The Woodford Reserve $1,000 Mint Julep Cup, made with specially sourced exotic ingredients and served in a silver julep cup with a gold plated straw. Each year the net proceeds are donated to a different charitable organization. The 2014 Derby was named “The Run For The Roses,” which inspired Woodford Reserve to create a julep with rosewater-infused ice and candied rose petals. I like to think it may have also been a nod to the julep’s early origins.

This year, the Kentucky Derby takes place on May 6 and 7. Thinking of hosting your own viewing party, complete with homemade mint juleps? Try the official Mint Julep recipe from Churchill Downs here. Or try this Mint Julep Ice Cream recipe (brilliant right?) from my friend Garrett McCord on Simple Recipes!

Research Sources:

Ayto, John, and John Ayto. An A-Z of Food and Drink. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. Print.

Carson, Gerald. The Social History of Bourbon, an Unhurried Account of Our Star Spangled American Drink. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1963. Print.

Harwell, Richard Barksdale. The Mint Julep. Charlottesville: U of Virginia, 1975. Print.

Johnson, Joseph. Medical Communications. Vol. 1. N.p.: Society for Promoting Medical Knowledge, 1784. Print.

McCulloch-Williams, Martha. Dishes & Beverages of the Old South. New York: McBride Nast, 1913 n.d. Web. Project Gutenberg 08 Apr. 2015.

“Mint Julep.” Kentucky Derby. Churchill Downs Incorporated, n.d. Web. 08 Apr. 2015.

Siemens, Shannan. “The Kentucky Derby’s $1,000 Mint Julep.” CNBC. CNBC, LLC, 14 Apr. 2014. Web. 08 Apr. 2015.

Smith, J. Soule. The Mint Julep, the Very Dream of Drinks: From the Old Receipt of Soule Smith, down in Lexington, Ky. Lexington, KY: Gravesend, 1949. Print.

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Looking Forward to May http://toriavey.com/toris-corner/2016/05/looking-forward-to-may/ http://toriavey.com/toris-corner/2016/05/looking-forward-to-may/#respond Tue, 03 May 2016 18:27:51 +0000 http://toriavey.com/?p=39233 Sharing upcoming movies, TV shows, books, events and more - what I'm looking forward to in May 2016!... Read More]]>

Looking Forward To April - Tori's Picks for May 2016

I don’t know about all of you, but I can’t believe May is already here! This year is seriously flying by. Here are the things I’m looking forward to this month!

THE MIRROR THIEF

Martin Seay’s The Mirror Thief weaves together three stories. Readers are taken to 16th century Venice, where Venetian glassmakers are perfecting the art of the mirror – an object of fascination and mystery. At the time, mirrors were considered state of the art technology, desired by royalty across the world. Those skilled enough to be a part of the mirror development team are forced to stay in Venice; if they try to leave, it is considered a crime punishable by death. One man with nothing to lose has a scheme that he hopes will help him escape the ordinance. Thrilling parallel stories unfold in 1950s Venice Beach, California, as well as in modern day – at the fictitious “Venice Casino” in Las Vegas. I haven’t delved into the crime genre much, but this one really sounds like a page turner. The novel is released in hardcover on May 10.

Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 2.04.43 PM

MOTHER’S DAY

May 8th is Mother’s Day, without a doubt my favorite of the so-called “Hallmark” holidays. Did you know the holiday actually has a pretty heartfelt story behind it? The idea of an American Mother’s Day came from Anna Jarvis, who, after her mother’s death in 1905, wanted a national holiday that would honor the sacrifices mothers make for their children. Anna’s mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, was a peace activist who offered her aid to all soldiers fighting in the Civil War, regardless of which side they fought on. Early on, Anna was able to organize several small-scale Mother’s Day church celebrations, but she wanted something bigger. After years of penning letters to newspapers and important politicians, President Wilson made her efforts worthwhile. I suggest celebrating mom with a homemade brunch. Need some ideas? Check out my Mothers Day Brunch recipe roundup!

Looking Forward To April - Tori's Picks for May 2016

 

TO CATCH A THIEF

Alfred Hitchcock’s To Catch a Thief is one of the more playful gems in the filmmaker’s repertoire. It stars two Hitchcock favorites, Cary Grant and Grace Kelly. Grant plays retired jewel thief John Robie, who has been living a quiet life in the French Riviera until a new burglar with a comparable skill set sends the police in search of Robie once again. In order to clear his name, Robie plans to find the true criminal by keeping a close eye on potential targets for burglary. At the top of this list are Frances Stevens, played by Grace Kelly, and her mother Jessie. When the women are robbed of their jewels they are initially suspicious of Robie, but soon Frances joins Robie in his plan to escape. Enjoy this classic film with a plate of Cary Grant’s Oven-Barbecued Chicken when it begins streaming on Netflix this month.

MEMORIAL DAY AND THE UNOFFICIAL BEGINNING OF SUMMER

Though summer officially begins on June 20, many of us would agree that Memorial Day is the unofficial beginning of barbecue season. I love cooking and hosting outdoors and the long weekend surrounding Memorial Day is something I look forward to every year. Amidst all of the hamburgers and fruity drinks, it’s easy to forget the true reason we celebrate Memorial Day– remembering our fallen U.S. soldiers and war heroes. I feel a profound gratitude to the men and women who serve our country; I am humbled by their sacrifice. Every year I try to attend a local Memorial Day celebration to support our troops and their families. I hope you have a chance to do the same during the holiday weekend. Whether you’re hosting your own party or attending one, be sure to check out my Memorial Day recipe roundup for some ideas on what to make!

 

Looking Forward To April - Tori's Picks for May 2016

LOVE & FRIENDSHIP

This film adaptation of Jane Austen’s posthumously published epistolary novel, Lady Janestars Kate Beckinsale as Lady Susan, a witty, selfish and beautiful widow who takes up a temporary residence in the home of her in-laws while waiting out the gossip surrounding a personal mishap. While away, she makes plans to find a match for her daughter Frederica, while simultaneously searching for a wealthy new husband herself. I adore all things Jane Austen (including the recipe for Apple Puffs made by Austen family friend Martha Lloyd) and am looking forward to this lighthearted romantic comedy. Catch Love & Friendship in theaters on Friday, May 13.

Don’t forget to let me know what you’re looking forward to this May!

Affiliate links help to support my website and the free recipe content I provide. A percentage of any purchase you make via these links will go towards buying ingredients, photography supplies and server space, as well as all the other expenses involved in running a large cooking website. Thank you very much for browsing!

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Vegan Lentil Mushroom Bolognese Sauce – “Faux”-lognese http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/05/vegan-bolognese-sauce/ http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/05/vegan-bolognese-sauce/#respond Mon, 02 May 2016 22:02:53 +0000 http://toriavey.com/?p=38703 “Faux”-lognese recipe for flavorful, healthy meatless pasta sauce with lentils, mushrooms, fire-roasted tomatoes and spices.... Read More]]>

Vegan Lentil Bolognese sauce - “Faux”-lognese recipe for flavorful, healthy meatless pasta sauce with lentils, mushrooms, fire-roasted tomatoes and spices on ToriAvey.com

Passover has passed over, and leavened grains are back in action. That means for tonight’s Meatless Monday dinner, pasta is on the menu! This is a recipe that I’ve been developing in my head for what seems like years now. I wanted to make sure it was something really special before sharing the recipe with all of you. The word “bolognese” conjures the image of a very meaty sauce and, let’s face it, often vegan versions of classic meat dishes just don’t measure up. They can certainly be tasty, but meaty? That’s a real challenge, especially if you don’t want to use those processed soy-laden ground meat alternatives. After mulling over what to put in this sauce, it was finally time to get in the kitchen and give it a try. After several tests, I believe I’ve come up with something truly tasty!

I’ve used lentils in vegan dishes before, like these tacos, but the real secret to this sauce is dried mushrooms. I first learned about the power of these dried-out delights when my friend Etti Hadar shared her family food history with me. Together, Etti and I read through a memoir written by her Uncle Dov, a Polish Jew who served in Italy in the Jewish Infantry Brigade and fought the Nazis during World War II before later settling in Israel. It was clear in the memoir that Uncle Dov loved food. In one section he discussed dried mushrooms, and the idea has always stuck with me. Because meat was expensive and difficult to find, especially in winter, mushrooms were often used as a meat substitute. They were collected during the summer, and Dov’s mother would string them up with a thread and needle, hanging them to dry in the attic beside the chimney. During winter, these dried mushrooms would be used in a number of different ways—they were sometimes added to potato soup, or “barbecued” like a meat entrée. Since learning this trick through Etti’s Uncle Dov, I’ve used dried mushrooms in a variety of dishes, but never as a true substitute for meat. When soaked and added to this bolognese, the mushrooms take on a meaty flavor and texture that even meat eaters will love. The savory flavor is off the charts!

Recommended Products:

Saute Pan with Lid

Mesh Strainer

Affiliate links help to support my website and the free recipe content I provide. A percentage of any purchase you make via these links will go towards buying ingredients, photography supplies and server space, as well as all the other expenses involved in running a large cooking website. Thank you very much for browsing

Food Photography Beauty Shots & Styling by Louise Mellor

Vegan Lentil Bolognese sauce - “Faux”-lognese recipe for flavorful, healthy meatless pasta sauce with lentils, mushrooms, fire-roasted tomatoes and spices on ToriAvey.com

Vegan Lentil Mushroom Bolognese Sauce – “Faux”-lognese

Ingredients

  • 2 oz. dried mushrooms (boletus, porcini or a mix)
  • 4 cups water
  • 2 cups green or brown lentils, rinsed and sorted
  • 6 cups low sodium vegetable broth
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 2 tbsp tamari sauce
  • 1 1/2 tsp crushed garlic
  • 28 oz. crushed fire roasted tomatoes
  • 1/3 cup fresh chopped parsley, divided
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 3/4 tsp salt, or more to taste
  • 1 tsp basil
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp thyme
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne (adds a kick - if spice sensitive, omit)
  • Cooked pasta for serving (if wheat sensitive use gluten free pasta)

You will also need

  • 4 qt. pot, handheld mesh strainer, 2-3 coffee filters, large 5 qt. sauté pan or sauce pot
Total Time: 45 Minutes
Servings: 8-10 sauce servings
Kosher Key: Pareve
  • Boil mushrooms in 4 cups water for 5 minutes. Let them soak in the hot water for a few minutes while you cook the lentils, until the liquid is dark brown and has cooled off a bit.
  • Meanwhile, bring lentils to a boil in vegetable broth. Reduce to a simmer, then cook for about 15 minutes or until just tender. Drain. Remove the soaked mushrooms with a slotted spoon and rinse them under cool running water to remove any excess residue. Chop up the soaked mushrooms, then rinse them once again (there can be stubborn debris that clings, multiple rinses are the best way to remove any residual dirt). Reserve the chopped mushrooms.
  • Line a handheld mesh strainer with a coffee filter. Strain the mushroom cooking liquid through a coffee filter into a bowl or measuring cup. This may take a few minutes and a bit of maneuvering. I find I have to swirl the liquid around a bit for it to go through the filter, and often I need to replace the filter a couple of times in order to get all of the liquid to go through. While this takes some effort, the liquid often contains a bit of dirt residue from the harvested mushrooms. Straining it out allows us to use this very flavorful liquid in the finished product. Reserve the strained liquid.
  • In a large 5 quart sauté pan or sauce pot, heat 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil over medium. Sauté diced onion for 10-15 minutes until soft, translucent and starting to turn golden.
  • Add the tomato paste, tamari and minced garlic to the onions. Sauté for 1-2 minutes longer until fragrant. Pour in the reserved mushroom liquid to deglaze the pan, scraping up the brown bits from the bottom and simmering them in the liquid for a few minutes.
  • Add the fire roasted tomatoes to the pot along with the cooked lentils, soaked diced mushrooms, ¼ cup freshly chopped parsley and remaining spices. Stir. Cook the mixture 10-15 minutes longer until the lentils are fully tender, the excess liquid has reduced, and the sauce is thick.
  • Serve sauce over pasta as a vegan alternative to Bolognese, or you can enjoy this on its own as a flavorful lentil stew. Garnish with remaining 1 tbsp parsley. If you’re not vegan, a sprinkle of parmesan on top is also lovely.

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Potato Crusted Spinach Frittata http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/potato-crusted-spinach-frittata/ http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/potato-crusted-spinach-frittata/#comments Tue, 19 Apr 2016 00:17:17 +0000 http://toriavey.com/?p=38986 Gluten free vegetarian frittata with spinach, crumbled goat cheese and a crispy potato crust on ToriAvey.com... Read More]]>

Potato Crusted Spinach Frittata - Gluten free vegetarian frittata with spinach, crumbled goat cheese and a crispy potato crust

I love that frittatas can be made with just about anything. As long as you have some fresh eggs and a few vegetables, you can make a frittata. Add some cheese and spices to make things even tastier. This potato crusted version came to me one night when I was trying to come up with a quick dinner. My stepdaughter loves all things potato. A few weeks ago I realized we had some leftover frozen hash browns– not enough for everyone to share, but I couldn’t let them go to waste. You all know I love a good breakfast for dinner and the idea just came to me – potato crusted frittata. It was so simple and such a quick success that I had to share it here. It’s sort of like an American riff on the Spanish tortilla de patatas… and with Passover right around the corner, it could make a terrific easy mid-week meal.

Every regional cuisine has their own version of this eggy entree, from French omelets to Chinese egg foo yung to  Spanish tortillas. The Italian expression “hai fatto una frittata,” which loosely translates to “you’ve made quite a mess,” is fitting given that the only required ingredients are beaten eggs, while the rest can be just about anything in your refrigerator. In Italian kitchens, cooks will sometimes set aside the leftovers from a big meal to use in a frittata the following day. It’s unclear when the frittata first started making an appearance in Italy, but given that they can be made with simple, inexpensive ingredients, it seems likely that they’ve been around for quite some time.

Note: This recipe can be made with frozen hash browns in place of shredded potatoes for the crust… which is exactly how I made it the first time. 🙂

Recommended Products:

Cast Iron Skillet

Affiliate links help to support my website and the free recipe content I provide. A percentage of any purchase you make via these links will go towards buying ingredients, photography supplies and server space, as well as all the other expenses involved in running a large cooking website. Thank you very much for browsing!

Food Photography Beauty Shots & Styling by Louise Mellor

Potato Crusted Spinach Frittata - Gluten free vegetarian frittata with spinach, crumbled goat cheese and a crispy potato crust

Potato Crusted Spinach Frittata

Ingredients

  • 2 medium russet potatoes, 1 lb. total, peeled
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 tbsp water
  • 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups fresh spinach, roughly chopped
  • 1 cup crumbled goat or feta cheese (you can omit the cheese to make this frittata dairy free)

You will also need

  • Cast iron skillet, lid to cover the top of the skillet, clean tea towel
Total Time: 30 Minutes
Servings: 6
Kosher Key: Dairy
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Shred the russet potatoes to fine shreds using a hand grater or a food processor.
  • Place the shreds in a bowl and cover with cold water. Let them sit for a few minutes while you prep the other ingredients.
  • Beat the eggs with 1 tbsp water, salt and pepper until fluffy. I usually use around ½ tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper (add less salt if using feta cheese, which is quite salty). Reserve the eggs.
  • Place a cast iron skillet on the stove and heat over medium high. While heating, drain the shreds in a colander, then place them in the middle of a clean tea towel.
  • Squeeze the shreds in the tea towel to remove excess liquid.
  • When the skillet is hot, pour 3 tbsp olive oil into it. It should be hot enough that you’ll see wisps of smoke coming from the surface. Immediately spread out the shreds into the bottom of the skillet, forming an even layer of shreds along the bottom. The shreds will sizzle.
  • Cover the skillet with a lid (any pot lid that covers the top will do) and reduce heat to medium. Let the potatoes cook for 2 minutes. Uncover the skillet. Spread out the chopped spinach evenly across the top of the potatoes in a single layer. Recover the skillet for 1 minute longer until the spinach is slightly wilted.
  • Uncover the skillet and sprinkle evenly with the crumbled cheese.
  • Re-beat the eggs, then pour evenly across the top of the cheese to cover.
  • Place the skillet into the preheated oven and let it cook at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center of the skillet comes out clean. Remove the frittata from the oven and let it cool for 5 minutes on the stovetop. Serve. The potatoes will form a golden brown crust on the bottom of each piece of frittata. Delicious!
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Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/passover-dessert-recipe-roundup/ http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/passover-dessert-recipe-roundup/#comments Sun, 17 Apr 2016 17:15:43 +0000 http://toriavey.com/?p=39157 Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com.... Read More]]>
 Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
When it comes to Passover desserts, the challenge of cooking without flour or leavening can be especially daunting. With a little creativity, you’d be amazed at the delicious treats you can whip up! Here is a roundup of some of my most popular Passover dessert recipes, along with contributions from past Passover Potlucks and a few other tasty ideas from my food blogger friends. Enjoy!
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
(note: for Ashkenazi Passover, substitute potato starch for corn starch)
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
(note: for Ashkenazi Passover, substitute cardamom for another Passover-friendly spice like cinnamon, or omit)
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
(note: for Ashkenazi Passover, substitute cardamom for another Passover-friendly spice, or omit)
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
(note: for Ashkenazi Passover, check curry powder for kosher certification, or omit)
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
Passover Dessert Recipe Roundup - Dozens of sweet ideas for your Passover Seder meal on ToriAvey.com
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Mediterranean Olive Chicken http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/mediterranean-olive-chicken/ http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/mediterranean-olive-chicken/#comments Tue, 12 Apr 2016 14:55:07 +0000 http://toriavey.com/?p=22029 Healthy marinated roast chicken recipe with Mediterranean marinade - green olives, lime, honey, garlic, oregano, red pepper flakes. ... Read More]]>

Mediterranean Olive Chicken - Healthy Roasted Marinated Chicken Recipe on ToriAvey.com

Note: I have updated this recipe from my archives with new photographs courtesy of Louise Mellor. This recipe is an oldie but a goodie. Enjoy!

I grew up eating a lot of chicken and a lot of fish. My mom and stepdad stuck to a heart-healthy diet, which meant that we rarely ate red meat. I used to complain about this when I was 6 or 7 years old… in fact, I had a little saying, which I liked to proclaim in sing-song fashion:

Chicken or fish, chicken or fish, all we ever eat is chicken or fish.

My mother, bless her heart, refrained from scolding me. She’d just smile, hand me my plate, and cheerfully announce that I was on dish duty. I quickly learned that I’d better stop complaining and eat up, or I’d be stuck doing dishes until I went to college.

Looking back, I find it funny that I was bummed about the lack of red meat in my childhood diet. Nowadays, I don’t eat much meat at all– in fact, I would say we’re about 80% vegetarian. We eat Mediterranean-style most of the time, which means we enjoy lots of veggies, fruits, whole grains and olive oil, and very little red meat. We prefer vegetarian entrees, but when we do choose to eat meat, it’s usually chicken or fish… more often chicken.

Because of our Mediterranean inclinations, I’m always coming up with new and creative ways to prepare chicken. I developed this recipe back in 2013, and it’s become a regular on our family meal rotation. It started with a container of ripe green olives in the fridge that I’d been wanting to use up. The thought of marinating those salty olives with chicken sounded enticing. I began throwing together all kinds of complimentary flavors– lime juice for a mild tartness, honey for sweetness, garlic and oregano, plus red pepper flakes for a kick. After marinating and roasting, the chicken turned out just lovely… aromatic, herby, juicy and full of flavor. The marinade created delectable olive-laden pan drippings, so I skimmed the fat, added white wine, and whipped up a delicious sauce.  It would make a great weeknight recipe, and it’s even special enough for a holiday meal. Try it and let me know what you think!

Recommended Products:

Mixing Bowls

Ceramic Baking Dish

Sauce Pan

Affiliate links help to support my website and the free recipe content I provide. A percentage of any purchase you make via these links will go towards buying ingredients, photography supplies and server space, as well as all the other expenses involved in running a large cooking website. Thank you very much for browsing!

Food Photography Beauty Shots & Styling by Louise Mellor

Mediterranean Olive Chicken - Healthy Roasted Marinated Chicken Recipe on ToriAvey.com

Mediterranean Olive Chicken

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup chopped ripe green olives
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 1 tbsp crushed garlic
  • 2 tsp honey
  • 1/2 tsp lime zest
  • 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes (if sensitive to spice, omit)
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • Salt and pepper
  • 4-5 lb chicken pieces, bone in, skin on (I like using chicken thighs)
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 2 tsp cornstarch or potato starch (use potato starch for Passover)

You will also need

  • 9x13 baking dish, plastic wrap, foil
Servings: 6-8
Kosher Key: Meat
  • In a mixing bowl, whisk together the chopped olives, olive oil, lime juice, garlic, honey, lime zest, red pepper flakes and oregano. Season the marinade with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Mediterranean Olive Chicken - Healthy Roasted Marinated Chicken Recipe on ToriAvey.comSprinkle the chicken pieces lightly with salt and pepper. Place chicken pieces in a 9x13 ceramic or glass baking dish. Brush the pieces evenly with olive marinade, using all of the marinade to coat.
  • Mediterranean Olive Chicken - Healthy Roasted Marinated Chicken Recipe on ToriAvey.comCover the baking dish with plastic wrap and place it in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours, up to overnight (overnight is best).
  • Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Remove the plastic wrap and cover the baking dish with parchment or foil. If using foil, pierce a few vents with a sharp knife around the outer edges. If using parchment, simply cover the dish loosely.
  • Place the covered dish in the oven. Let the chicken bake for 60 minutes, then remove the parchment or foil and cook for an additional 15-30 minutes, basting periodically, until well cooked and tender. At the end of cooking, you may broil it for a minute or two to brown the skin-- watch carefully to make sure it doesn't burn!
  • Mediterranean Olive Chicken - Healthy Roasted Marinated Chicken Recipe on ToriAvey.comTransfer chicken pieces to a platter. Carefully tip the baking dish so that the pan drippings and juices gather in one corner. Use a spoon to skim off the clear liquid fat, separating it from the solid drippings. Discard the fat.
  • Pour the remaining drippings into a small saucepan along with ¼ cup of white wine. Heat the sauce slowly over medium.
  • While sauce is heating, whisk together 1 tbsp cornstarch or 2 tsp potato starch and 2 tbsp water till smooth. Pour the starchy liquid into the saucepan and whisk until combined. Heat the sauce until bubbling and thickened.
  • Serve the chicken topped with warm sauce. Note: this recipe is kosher for Passover if you use potato starch and Passover-approved products with a kosher hechsher.
  • Mediterranean Olive Chicken - Healthy Roasted Marinated Chicken Recipe on ToriAvey.com

Other Great Recipe Ideas

The Pioneer Woman: Herb Roasted Whole Chicken

Tasty Kitchen: Chipotle Grilled Chicken Tacos

Recipe Girl: Cilantro Chicken

Kalyn’s Kitchen: Chicken Souvlaki

Leite’s Culinaria: Peruvian Roast Chicken

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Sweet Potato Spinach Quinoa Gratin http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/sweet-potato-spinach-quinoa-gratin/ http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/sweet-potato-spinach-quinoa-gratin/#comments Tue, 12 Apr 2016 00:53:39 +0000 http://toriavey.com/?p=39088 Vegan gluten free entree for Passover or anytime, topped with a rich coconut-saffron “gratin” sauce.... Read More]]>

Sweet Potato Spinach Quinoa Gratin - Vegan gluten free casserole entree for Passover or anytime, topped with a rich coconut-saffron “gratin” sauce.

Developing a vegan entree for Passover is tough business. My vegan guests deserve an entree at the Seder table, but finding one that is flavorful enough for a holiday is a real challenge. Over the past couple of Passovers I’ve given myself the task of coming up with a vegan entree option that isn’t just an afterthought, but something truly comforting and filling. When you remove meat and dairy, then apply Passover restrictions to your list of options – there’s not a whole lot left to work with! Never one to shy away from a challenge, I put on my thinking cap and came up with something pretty amazing. Vegan or not, this casserole is really, really delicious!

This recipe was inspired by my Dairy Free Saffron Scalloped Potatoes, which are made with a delectable coconut milk and saffron-based sauce. It has the creaminess of a dairy dish with the exotic flavor of saffron, which elevates it to something truly special. To make the dish more filling, I sandwiched a layer of quinoa and spinach between the roasted sweet potato slices, topped it with sauce, then baked and broiled it gratin-style. The quinoa provides Passover-friendly protein and makes the dish more hearty overall. This recipe is something I’ve been developing in my head over a the course a few weeks, knowing that all of the ingredients are tasty and should work well together. Even so, I wasn’t sure it would work until I tested it– then retested it– then tested it again, because I couldn’t stop eating it! This Sweet Potato Spinach Quinoa Gratin is really unique, and it’s also a very pretty dish. It’s definitely worth a try as a vegan option for the Seder table, or for Meatless Monday, or just because. Enjoy!

Recommended Products:

Mortar and Pestle

Sauce Pan

Baking Dish

Affiliate links help to support my website and the free recipe content I provide. A percentage of any purchase you make via these links will go towards buying ingredients, photography supplies and server space, as well as all the other expenses involved in running a large cooking website. Thank you very much for browsing!

Food Photography Beauty Shots & Styling by Louise Mellor

Sweet Potato Spinach Quinoa Gratin - Vegan gluten free casserole entree for Passover or anytime, topped with a rich coconut-saffron “gratin” sauce.

Sweet Potato Spinach Quinoa Gratin

Ingredients

  • 2 large orange sweet potatoes (2 lbs. total) peeled and sliced into rounds 1/8 inch thick
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 2 cups low sodium vegetable broth
  • 3 cups roughly chopped spinach
  • 1 pinch saffron threads (make sure it’s good quality saffron - it’s much more expensive, but the cheap stuff has no flavor)
  • 2 tbsp hot water
  • 2 tbsp non-hydrogenated margarine
  • 1 tbsp potato starch
  • 1 can (14 oz) full fat coconut milk
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp finely minced garlic (or ¼ tsp garlic powder)
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (adds heat – use less if spice sensitive)

You will also need

  • 2 baking sheets, mesh colander, mortar and pestle, 8x8 inch baking dish, small saucepan, whisk, ladle
Total Time: 1 Hour 15 Minutes
Servings: 6
Kosher Key: Pareve
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spread the sweet potato slices across two lightly greased baking sheets. Toss each sheet of slices with 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil to lightly coat the slices.
  • Roast the sweet potatoes for 20 minutes in the oven, stirring the potatoes and turning each baking sheet around once during cooking, until slices are tender and starting to caramelize.
  • While sweet potatoes are roasting, rinse the quinoa out well in a mesh colander until water runs clear. Combine rinsed quinoa and low sodium vegetable broth in a pot and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover the pot, and cook for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until broth is absorbed and quinoa is tender/fluffy. When the quinoa is finished cooking, quickly open the pot and add the roughly chopped spinach on top of the cooked quinoa. Recover the pot and let it rest for 5 minutes while the spinach wilts on top of the quinoa. Stir the spinach into the quinoa. Reserve.
  • After sweet potatoes are removed from the oven, reduce heat to 350 degrees F. Reserve the sweet potato slices. Grind the saffron threads in a mortar and pestle to a powder. Add 2 tbsp of hot water to the ground saffron and let it soak for a few minutes.
  • Lightly grease an 8x8 inch baking dish. Place half of the sweet potato slices in a thin layer on the bottom of the dish, with each slice overlapping the next.
  • Spread the cooked quinoa/spinach mixture over the first sweet potato layer.
  • Make a top layer with the remaining sweet potato slices.
  • In a small saucepan, melt 2 tbsp non-hydrogenated margarine over medium heat. Whisk in 1 tbsp potato starch to form a thick paste.
  • Slowly whisk in the coconut milk. Whisk in the salt, garlic, cayenne pepper, and the reserved saffron water. Heat the sauce over medium, whisking frequently, until it boils and thickens into a golden yellow sauce. Reduce heat to low and keep warm.
  • Pour the sauce over the layer of sweet potatoes, using a ladle or large spoon to make sure the potatoes are evenly covered with sauce.
  • Place dish in the oven and bake covered for 20 minutes until heated through. Remove the foil and turn on your broiler. Place your baking dish 6 inches below the broiler. Broil the casserole for a few minutes until the top is nicely, evenly browned. Serve warm.
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Passover Potato Kugel http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/passover-potato-kugel/ http://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/2016/04/passover-potato-kugel/#comments Sun, 10 Apr 2016 03:50:43 +0000 http://toriavey.com/blog/?p=1038 Easy, delicious recipe for potato kugel. Crispy and golden on the outside, fluffy on the inside. Kosher for Passover.... Read More]]>

Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.

Kugel is a quintessentially Jewish dish that is best described as a baked pudding. The dish originated over 800 years ago in Germany and quickly became popular with Jewish families throughout Eastern Europe. There are many kinds of kugels—noodle kugelssweet kugels, savory kugels. Slow cooking overnight kugels developed because Orthodox families were not allowed to cook during the hours of Shabbat. During the Passover holiday, noodles and sweets take a back seat to dairy-free and flour-free potato kugels, which are served alongside other holiday classics like brisket, roast chicken and matzo ball soup.

For the past several years I’ve been refining my potato kugel recipe. My goal was to create a kugel with the soul of a latke– one big, fluffy, sliceable latke that can serve a large crowd. I’ve learned, over time, to keep things simple… potatoes, eggs, onions and fat, a little starch, some salt and pepper – that’s all you need to make a great kugel. The rest is all about technique. I used to put matzo meal in my kugel to bind it, but have since switched over to potato starch (the “secret ingredient” I use to make crispy, amazing latkes). The starch makes for a lighter, fluffier texture inside… it’s also gluten free for those who have dietary restrictions. Over time I learned to preheat my baking dish, a technique I picked up from my sister-in-law. This step produces a really brown, beautiful crust on the kugel that simply can’t be obtained by oven cooking alone.

This Passover Potato Kugel is everything a kugel should be… crispy on the outside while soft, fluffy and tender inside. It’s like one enormous latke, an irresistible addition to any Seder table. I highly recommend the schmaltz (rendered chicken fat) if you can swing it. If you prefer to keep it meat-free, use olive oil and it will still be very, very tasty. Enjoy!

Note: I am always working to make my recipes better. I have improved this recipe and reposted it with new pictures. If you’re looking for the old recipe, leave a comment and let me know. I plan to post another”improved” potato kugel recipe with Sephardic spices in the coming weeks. Stay tuned!

Recommended Products:

Food Processor

Cast Iron Baking Dish

Metal Baking Pan

Porcelain Baking Dish

Affiliate links help to support my website and the free recipe content I provide. A percentage of any purchase you make via these links will go towards buying ingredients, photography supplies and server space, as well as all the other expenses involved in running a large cooking website. Thank you very much for browsing!

Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.

Passover Potato Kugel

ingredients

  • 5 lbs russet potatoes (about 10 medium-sized potatoes)
  • 2 large onions
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 6 tbsp potato starch (if not serving for Passover you may substitute corn starch)
  • 1/4 cup schmaltz or extra virgin olive oil, divided (schmaltz gives amazing flavor; use olive oil to keep it vegetarian)

You will also need

  • 9x13 ceramic, metal or cast iron baking dish or pan (I don't recommend using glass), food processor with grating attachment or hand grater, mixing bowls, pastry brush
Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Cook Time: 70 Minutes
Total Time: 90 Minutes
Servings: 15
Kosher Key: Pareve or Meat (depending on fat used), Kosher for Passover
  • Place a 9x13 baking dish or pan in the oven and preheat oven to 400 degrees, letting the dish heat up inside. Peel the potatoes, then use a food processor or hand grater to grate them into large shreds.
  • Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.Place the potato shreds in a large mixing bowl and cover with cold water. Let the shreds sit for a few minutes.
  • Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.Meanwhile, peel and shred the two large onions in the food processor or with a hand grater. Reserve.
  • Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, salt and pepper until fluffy.
  • Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.Drain the potato shreds in a colander, pushing down firmly on top of the shreds with your hands to push out the excess liquid.
  • Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.Place grated potatoes in a large bowl. Add the seasoned eggs, grated onions and potato starch to the bowl. Use your hands to mix all ingredients together until well combined.
  • Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.Take the preheated baking dish out of the oven. Quickly pour in 3 tbsp schmaltz or olive oil, then use a pastry brush to carefully spread the fat around the bottom and sides of the hot dish. Careful, don't burn yourself! The hot dish, while a bit difficult to navigate, will help to form a beautiful brown and crisp crust for the kugel.
  • Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.Carefully and quickly spread the potato mixture into an even layer in the baking dish (it should sizzle!), then drizzle remaining 1 tbsp of melted schmaltz or olive oil across the top.
  • Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.Bake uncovered at 400 degrees for 60-70 minutes until the top is nicely browned all across the top. If it seems to be browning too fast (before the center is cooked), cover the kugel to keep it from over-browning. You really want it to have a nice golden crust-- at the end of cooking, if it's not quite brown enough, you can put it 6 inches below the broiler for a minute or two to evenly brown it all across the top. This kugel tastes best served hot directly from the oven. Let it sit for 5-10 minutes before slicing and serving.
  • Passover Potato Kugel - Traditional Jewish Kugel with Potatoes, Onions and Eggs for the Passover Holiday.
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