The History Kitchen Contributors

Tori Avey

Tori Avey acts as editor and curator of The History Kitchen, where she shares her food history writing and seeks out creative contributors from throughout the culinary world. She explores the story behind the food – why we eat what we eat, how the foods of different cultures have evolved, and how yesterday’s food can inspire us in the kitchen today. Tori specializes in adapting historical recipes for the modern kitchen while telling the stories behind those recipes, allowing readers to recreate and enjoy the flavors of the past. In addition to her work on The History Kitchen, Tori writes an award-winning kosher food blog called The Shiksa in the Kitchen. She is a member of the International Association of Culinary Professionals, the American Anthropological Association, the American Folklore Society, the Association for the Study of Food and Society, and the Culinary Historians of Southern California. She currently chairs the IACP Food History section. Her History Kitchen articles are syndicated bimonthly on PBS Food. Follow Tori and The History Kitchen on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google+. Read Tori’s posts here.

Gil Marks

Gil Marks writes about the history of American Cakes for The History Kitchen, revealing the history and culture of the United States through its classic treat. An author, historian, chef, and social worker, Gil Marks is a leading authority on the history and culture of culinary subjects. Among his published books are James Beard Award finalist Encyclopedia of Jewish Food (Wiley: 2010), James Beard Award-winning Olive Trees and Honey: A Treasury of Vegetarian Recipes from Jewish Communities Around the World (Wiley 2004), and James Beard Award finalist The World of Jewish Cooking (Simon & Schuster, 1996).  He was also among the international team of contributors to the prestigious Meals in Science and Practice (Woodhead Publishing, 2009) and Recipes Remembered: A Celebration of Survival (Ruder Finn Press, 2011). In January 2012, Saveur Magazine included Encyclopedia of Jewish Food in its “100 New Classics,” as “an indispensable resource.” Gil has also written articles for numerous magazines; served as a guest lecturer at the Culinary Institute of America, Hazon, the New York Public Library, and the Roger Smith Cookbook Conference; acted as consultant for various companies and organizations; and given presentations throughout the world. Follow Gil on Facebook and Twitter. Read Gil’s posts here.

Louise Mellor

Chef Louise Mellor writes about vintage recipes and antique cookbooks, and also shares her gorgeous food photography on The History Kitchen. Chef Louise aka Geez Louise! has been making everyday more delicious for over 15 years as a private chef, caterer, culinary instructor, recipe developer, food stylist, and media spokesperson. Louise is a professional chef, food and lifestyle expert with vintage flair. She has a degree in culinary arts and was formally trained in classical French cuisine at the prestigious Le Cordon Bleu. With her classic “Americana” charm, Louise shares her contagious excitement about food and wine working with well-known brands as a media spokesperson and hosting culinary events. You can find Louise online dishing up classic American comfort food on her blog, Geez Louise! Louise’s blog has been featured on Saveur, Fine Cooking and in 2013 she was named as one of Babble’s Top 100 Mommy bloggers. Follow Louise on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Read Louise’s posts here.

Michael TwittyMichael W. Twitty explores African American and Southern foodways for The History Kitchen. He is a recognized culinary historian, community scholar, and living history interpreter focusing on historic African American food and folk culture.  He is webmaster of www.afroculinaria.com, the first website/blog devoted to the preservation of historic African American foodways.  He has conducted classes and workshops, written curricula and educational programs, giving lectures and performed cooking demonstrations for over 100 groups including the Smithsonian Institution, Colonial Williamsburg, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, Library of Congress, and Oxford University’s Symposium on Food and Cookery.  He has been profiled in the Washington Post and interviewed multiple times on NPR, including on the acclaimed food program The Spendid Table. He is well known for his expertise in the history and heritage of enslaved African Americans and their foodways and his knowledge of growing African American heirloom crops, open hearth cooking, heritage breed livestock, and wild flora and fauna utilized by enslaved Africans and their descendants. Follow Michael on Facebook and Twitter. Read Michael’s posts here.

Sharon Biggs Waller

Sharon Biggs Waller writes about historical and vintage cooking techniques for The History Kitchen. Sharon developed a passion for historical cooking at age fourteen when she took pioneer cooking at sleep-away camp.  She carried that love into adulthood when she became an interpretive national park ranger.  She showed visitors how maple syrup, apple cider, sorghum molasses, and jam were made the old-fashioned way at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Today she is a historical young adult novelist and freelance magazine writer for Urban Farm, Hobby Farms, Hobby Farm Home, and Chickens. Viking/Penguin will release her debut historical novel, A Mad, Wicked Folly, in 2014. She is also the co-author of The Original Horse Bible (i5 Publishing) under her maiden name, Sharon Biggs. She lives on a hobby farm outside of Chicago with her husband Mark, two horses, five dairy goats, four cats, two dogs, 50 laying hens, a gaggle of geese, and a hive of bees. You can find her at sharonbiggswaller.com; as a contributor to Corsets, Cutlasses & Candlesticks; and on Twitter. Read Sharon’s posts here.

Bruce Kraig Bio

 

Bruce Kraig is Professor Emeritus in History at Roosevelt University in Chicago where he taught a wide variety of courses in history, anthropology, and popular culture. Kraig has appeared widely in the electronic media as writer and on-camera host and narrator for a multi-award winning PBS series on food and culture around the world. Publications range from books and articles in academic journals on European and world prehistory through American history. Books about cookery and culinary include Mexican-American Plain Cooking, The Cuisines of Hidden Mexico, Hot Dog: A Global History, and Man Bites Dog: Hot Dog Culture in America (2012). He is the editor of the “Heartland Foodways” book series for the University of Illinois Press and a co-editor of the newly inaugurated “Encyclopedia of Chicago Food” (U of Illinois Press). Among hundreds of public talks given are the keynote address at a Pillsbury Bake-Off, Smithsonian Institutions’ Museums on Main Street projects, keynote address at the Australian Symposium on Gastronomy, and he has addressed the Library of Congress on food history. Kraig is the Past and Founding President of the Culinary Historians of Chicago. Read Bruce’s posts here.

Ken Albala Bio

Ken Albala is Professor of History at the University of the Pacific and author or editor of 17 books on food including Eating Right in the Renaissance, Food in Early Modern Europe, Cooking in Europe 1250-1650, The Banquet, Beans (winner of the 2008 IACP Jane Grigson Award), Pancake and Grow Food, Cook Food, Share Food. Until recently he was co-editor of the journal Food, Culture and Society. He has also co-edited The Business of Food, Human Cuisine, Food and Faith and edited Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia, A Cultural History of Food: The Renaissance and The Routledge International Handbook to Food Studies. Albala is series editor of Rowman and Littlefield Studies in Food and Gastronomy for which he has written Three World Cuisines: Italian, Chinese, Mexican (winner of the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards best foreign cuisine book in the world for 2012). He has also co-authored two cookbooks: The Lost Art of Real Cooking and The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home. Forthcoming this year are a Food History Reader: Primary Sources, Nuts and a translation of the 16th century cookbook Livre fort excellent de cuysine. Albala is also now editing a 3 volume encyclopedia on Food Issues. Follow Ken on Facebook and Twitter. Read Ken’s posts here.

Photography Contributors

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Kelly Jaggers

Kelly Jaggers shares her delicious food photography with The History Kitchen. Kelly is a cookbook author, recipe developer, food photographer, and founder of the recipe blog Evil Shenanigans. She specializes in creating indulgent recipes featuring fresh, seasonal ingredients … and lots and lots of butter. Kelly is the author of The Everything Pie Cookbook, Not-So-Humble Pies, and Moufflet, and she is the food stylist and photographer for Martha Pullen’s Southern Family Cookbook and The Big Book of Martinis for Moms. When she is not busy cooking up a storm in her own kitchen she teaches cooking classes, designs wedding cakes, and speaks about food blogging and recipe development. Kelly lives in Dallas, Texas with her husband and three dogs. You can connect with her on Twitter, Facebook, G+ and Pinterest.