Chicken and Waffles

If  you read my post about the History of Chicken and Waffles, then you might be craving a batch yourself right about now. No need to travel to Roscoe’s Chicken and Waffles or Gladys and Ron’s… you can make it yourself at home! It’s easy. Here’s a fried chicken recipe along with my family’s waffle recipe. It’s not exactly Wells, but it is a really great pairing. On their own, they’re delicious treats. When served together, with butter and maple syrup… wow! Seriously awesome eating. If you’re on a diet, don’t touch this meal with a ten food pole. If you’re looking for a serious dose of comfort food, press print immediately!

Note: An easy kosher modification appears below for those who find it useful.

Chicken and Waffles

Fried Chicken Ingredients

  • 2 cups self rising flour
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup red hot sauce
  • 1/4 cup water
  • Salt
  • Garlic powder
  • 2 1/2 lbs chicken pieces, bone in, skin on
  • 5 pints peanut oil for deep frying

Waffle Ingredients

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 3/4 cups warm lowfat milk
  • 1/4 cup melted butter
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (optional)

Condiments

  • Maple syrup, butter, hot sauce

You will also need

  • 6 quart heavy bottomed pot, mixing bowls, waffle iron, paper towels
Total Time: 35 Minutes
Servings: 8

To Make Fried Chicken

  • In a medium bowl, beat the eggs, water, and hot sauce together. Reserve.
  • In another medium bowl, combine the self rising flour and 1 tsp black pepper.
  • Sprinkle the chicken pieces generously with salt, then lightly with garlic powder.
  • Dip the seasoned chicken pieces into the egg mixture, then coat in the seasoned flour.
  • Pour oil into a deep pot up to half full with oil, then heat over medium till hot enough for frying (350 degrees F as measured on a candy thermometer).
  • Submerge the chicken pieces carefully into the hot oil. Let the chicken fry till crispy and cooked through. Dark meat will take 13-14 minutes, white meat 8-10 minutes.
  • Place fried chicken on paper towels to drain off excess oil. Serve.

To Make Waffles

  • Preheat your waffle iron. In a large mixing bowl, sift together flour, salt, sugar and baking powder.
  • In a medium mixing bowl, beat the eggs, then beat in the lukewarm milk, butter and vanilla till well combined.
  • Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir will a batter forms. A few small lumps are okay.
  • Pour the batter onto your waffle iron in batches. Amount per waffle will vary according to the size of your waffle iron. Let the waffles cook till golden brown and crisp.
  • Serve hot waffles with warm fried chicken, warmed maple syrup, and butter on the side.
  • Optional Kosher Modifications: Substitute almond or soy milk for buttermilk, use a non-hydrogentated butter substitute (like Earth Balance) to replace the butter.

Comments (10)Post a Comment

  1. My son who has a web design firm in Oklahoma posted that he treated his employees to Chicken ‘n Waffles. I went “Ugh!” until I wandered upon your recipe. Now such an incomprehensive combination sounds delish.

  2. I’ve never tried chicken and waffles but I’ve seen it made a couple times on the food network and I’ve always wanted to try it. Looks so good I’m going to make that tonight

  3. This is fine, but your introductory comments continue the myth that chicken and waffles is only an African American dish. The Pennsylvania Dutch have been making C&W for centuries. I know you mentioned them in your column on the topic — but on page two. Why are mentions of the PA Dutch C&W dish always buried? Our version of this meal is more than a second-rate afterthought. How about giving a PA Dutch C&W recipe as well?

    1. Carn, the PBS column (where the reference occurs on page 2) was a syndicated version of my original History Kitchen column on this site. The reference to the Pennsylvania Dutch dish is by no means buried:

      link to toriavey.com

      The truth is, chicken and waffles was popularized in Harlem; if Wells supper club had not added it to their menu, it would likely have remained a local Pennsylvania Dutch specialty and probably would not have gained wider notoriety in the United States. That said, it would be fun to explore the Pennsylvania Dutch dish further and perhaps post a recipe. I will consider it for a future post.

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