Gluten Free Chicken Schnitzel

I created a gluten free version of Chicken Schnitzel for a friend of mine who has gluten intolerance; the recipe appears below. Using almond meal in the place of breadcrumbs, I was able to create a delicious (and healthy!) substitute for breaded schnitzel. I added za’atar spice blend and seasoned the mix for extra flavor. She was so pleased with the result that she now makes it regularly for her family!

Bob’s Red Mill makes a kosher GF almond meal that works great in this recipe, but you can use any GF almond meal you like. Replacing the breadcrumbs with almond meal also makes this schnitzel recipe low carb, so if you’re watching your carb intake, this is a great option.

Za’atar is a traditional Middle Eastern spice blend that is absolutely delicious. It can usually be found in kosher or Middle Eastern markets, but you may have a hard time locating it at your normal grocery store. Also, za’atar recipes vary greatly from brand to brand – it should only be made from herbs, sesame, spices and salt – but some contain fillers, so you want to take extra precautions to make sure your za’atar is certified gluten free. If you can’t find GF za’atar, here’s an easy substitute: 2 tbsp dried parsley flakes, ½ tsp dried crushed mint, and 1 tbsp sesame seeds. Not the same as za’atar, but it will do in a pinch!

Gluten Free Chicken Schnitzel

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs boneless skinless chicken breasts (4 large breasts)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 1/4 cup za'atar spice blend (or substitute)
  • 1 tbsp paprika
  • 1/2 tbsp sesame seeds
  • Salt and pepper
  • Oil for frying (pick one with a high smoke point like grapeseed)
  • Fresh lemon wedges for garnish

Za'atar Substitute

  • 2 tbsp parsley flakes, ½ tsp dried crushed mint, & 1 tbsp sesame seeds

You will also need

  • Plastic wrap, mallet, skillet, paper towels
Prep Time: 20 Minutes
Cook Time: 15 Minutes
Total Time: 35 Minutes
Servings: 4 servings
Kosher Key: Meat
  • Lay down a 2-foot long strip of plastic wrap on your kitchen countertop. Place chicken breasts on the plastic, leaving a 2-inch space between each breast. Cover the breasts with another strip of plastic, so the meat is sandwiched between two layers of plastic. Use a mallet to pound the breasts until they are a little less than ¼ inch thick. Season breasts with salt and pepper.
  • Set up two wide, shallow bowls and a large plate on your countertop. In your first bowl, beat the eggs. In your second bowl, stir together the almond meal, za’atar spice blend, paprika, sesame seeds, and 1 tsp salt till well blended. Leave an empty plate nearby where you will place your coated schnitzels.
  • Pour oil into a skillet until it’s deep enough for frying (about ½ inch). Heat the oil slowly over medium. While oil is heating, dip each breast one by one into your breading bowls—first coat with egg, then with almond meal mixture. Pat the almond meal coating onto all visible sides of the breasts, making sure there’s an even layer of coating over all the visible surfaces.
  • The ideal temperature to fry schnitzel is around 375 degrees F. When the oil is hot (but not smoking or splattering), fry the coated breasts in single-layer batches until they are golden brown on both sides. If your oil is at the right temperature, it should take about 3-4 minutes per side. Don’t fry more than two breasts at a time in a regular sized skillet, or the oil temperature will drop and the schnitzels will become greasy.
  • Frying Note: The gluten free schnitzel coating will shed a bit during the frying process, which dirties the oil. Frying up to four breasts in the oil (two batches of two breasts each, one immediately after the other) will work fine. If you are planning on frying more than four breasts, dispose of the oil, clean the skillet, and reheat a batch of fresh oil before proceeding. Or, you can let the oil cool and strain it clean between batches. If you don’t, you’ll wind up with some dirty looking schnitzels!
  • After frying, set the schnitzels on a paper towel and pat them dry to soak off excess oil. Sprinkle the schnitzels with salt to taste. Serve hot garnished with lemon wedges and your favorite condiment.

Comments (19)Post a Comment

  1. Very good - 4 starsVery good - 4 starsVery good - 4 starsVery good - 4 starsVery good - 4 stars
    Hi Tori,

    The Schnitzel recipe sounds great, but, what about being allergic to wheat, eggs, soy, milk, etc.?

    Can you then use the cornstarch & seltzer to replace the eggs?

    1. Jo-Ann,

      This recipe just specifies gluten free for those who are gluten intolerant.

      There also isn’t any soy or milk needed, as well as cornstarch and seltzer.

      Maybe you should read the recipe before commenting.

  2. Excellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 stars
    This was AMAZING. So simple. I’ve tried variations of this before, but the za’atar was genius. Love it. Will be making this often!

    1. That looks like a pleaser for anyone, whether or not gluten is a problem. The salad looks to me like the standard salad served in Greece or the middle east–diced tomatoes, cucumber, onion, and this one has a lot of minced parsley or maybe some mint–dressing is usually lemon juice and olive oil. YUM–off to put almonds in the food processor!

  3. Looking for gluten free recipe for Pesach. Interesting comments, but find ‘Michelle’ rather harsh on Jo-Ann. She was only asking a question – take a chill pill Michelle.

  4. Is Almold Meal the same as Almond Flour. Many thanks. Im just new to this site and am looking forward to all the healthy recipes.

  5. Excellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 stars
    I have never left a comment for an online recipe before, but wow! This was awesome. I am new to the gluten-free world, and I think the almond meal idea has revolutionized my life. I also managed to impress someone who grew up in Germany, but tries to avoid too many carbs! :)

  6. Excellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 stars
    My family LOVES this recipe! I make it anytime thinly sliced turkey breast goes on sale. My husband swears that it’s better than the schnitzel at our local German restaurant. It took me awhile to find a grocery store that sells real za’atar spice, but it was totally worth it.

  7. I like to make my own spice mixes so I know exactly what is in them, and to help control the amount of salt goes into my cooking. That being said, I have never heard of or used Za’Atar mix/spice. I did find this recipe online at the line below.

    I noticed it was stated there were many different types. Can someone who uses Za’Atar or knows what “should” be in tell me if this is close to what is suppose to be.

    It calls for Sumac, Sesame seeds, thyme, Oregano, Marjoram, Savory, and Salt (to taste).

    link to web.archive.org

    1. Hi Joseph– za’atar varies quite a bit depending on who is making it. This recipe would be fine, however you should be able to find a premixed blend at any kosher market or Middle Eastern store. You can always make it yourself and omit the salt if you are watching your sodium; here it is used more for the herb flavor. You can always salt the schnitzel to taste after frying it. Enjoy!

  8. Excellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 stars
    I found a different za’Atar recipe. It Called for Sumac (which I found at my local Garden Fresh), fresh Thyme, and Sesame seeds. I didn’t have the Almond Flour so I used some Rice flour I made from a combination of Pearl and Long Grain Rice. Family LOVED it. Looking forward to trying some more recipes from this site.

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