Homemade Rhubarb Syrup

Homemade Rhubarb Syrup - Simple Step-by-Step Recipe for Rhubarb Infused Simple Syrup from Tori Avey

Rhubarb was wildly popular in Victorian England after a new variety was introduced at Queen Victoria’s coronation. The variety, later known as Victoria rhubarb, was easier to grow than previous forms. It was cooked into all sorts of sweets, from pies and fools to jams, jellies and custards. Though technically considered a vegetable, rhubarb is most often treated like a fruit in cooking. Rhubarb is usually combined with sweet flavors to counteract its natural tartness, but it can also be paired with savory dishes alongside cheeses and meat.

Rhubarb is coming into season now in California and I’m starting to see those familiar pinkish-green stalks at the market. I enjoy playing with rhubarb in various dessert and drink preparations. This rhubarb simple syrup is great when mixed into cocktails, but it can also lend a unique flavor to sparkling water or juice. When reduced to a thicker syrup (directions are given below) it can be served over pancakes, waffles or even on top of oatmeal as a seasonal spring alternative to maple syrup.

When shopping for rhubarb, look for stalks that are crisp, bright pink, thin, and clean looking (no damage from insects or disease). The thinner and darker pink the rhubarb is, the sweeter it will be. Avoid stalks that seem too old or slimy. Lighter colored stalks tend to be more tart, which is fine in this recipe since it calls for a good amount of sugar.

Homemade Rhubarb Syrup - Simple Step-by-Step Recipe for Rhubarb Infused Simple Syrup from Tori Avey

Homemade Rhubarb Syrup

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs rhubarb
  • 1 quart (4 cups) water
  • 1 3/4 cups sugar

You will also need

  • Fine mesh strainer, two medium saucepans
Cook Time: 25 Minutes
Total Time: 40 Minutes
Servings: 3 1/2 cups rhubarb syrup
Kosher Key: Pareve
  • Rinse the rhubarb clean.
  • Homemade Rhubarb Syrup - Simple Step by Step Recipe for Rhubarb Infused Simple Syrup From Tori Avey Remove the ends and chop the rhubarb into small pieces. Place the chopped rhubarb in a medium saucepan.
  • Homemade Rhubarb Syrup - Simple Step by Step Recipe for Rhubarb Infused Simple Syrup From Tori Avey Cover with water and bring to a boil. Reduce to a medium simmer and let the rhubarb cook for about 20 minutes. Skim any foam that rises to the top.
  • Homemade Rhubarb Syrup - Simple Step by Step Recipe for Rhubarb Infused Simple Syrup From Tori Avey After about 20 minutes, the rhubarb will become mushy and will have lost most of its color. The water will be a bright pink/red. Remove from heat. Strain the rhubarb liquid through a fine mesh strainer into another clean pot, separating the rhubarb from the liquid. Because the rhubarb breaks down more than raspberries or strawberries, the resulting liquid will be slightly more opaque.
  • Homemade Rhubarb Syrup - Simple Step by Step Recipe for Rhubarb Infused Simple Syrup From Tori Avey Once the rhubarb liquid has been strained, discard the rhubarb. Add 1 ¾ cups of sugar to the rhubarb liquid. Bring back to a boil, stirring frequently to dissolve the sugar into the syrup. Let the syrup simmer for 5 minutes till the sugar is completely dissolved, skimming any additional foam that rises to the top.
  • Homemade Rhubarb Syrup - Simple Step by Step Recipe for Rhubarb Infused Simple Syrup From Tori Avey Remove from the heat and allow to cool completely. Pour into a glass container, seal and refrigerate. The syrup should last for several weeks.
  • Note: If you prefer a thicker syrup for use on pancakes or waffles, you can simmer it for several minutes longer till the liquid reduces and thickens more. The consistency as written is perfect for mixing into beverages.
  • Homemade Rhubarb Syrup - Simple Step-by-Step Recipe for Rhubarb Infused Simple Syrup from Tori Avey

Comments (23)Post a Comment

  1. I have a few bags of rhubarb that I froze from last season. Any chance I can use it to make this syrup? Looks wonderful, thanks.

  2. I love rhubarb and this year’s crop in abundant in Arizona. I try to stay away from sugar. Have you tried this with stevia (I grow my own) or agave nectar? Or perhaps honey or coconut sugar?

    1. I have not Penny, and I would worry that the syrup might not thicken the same way it would with sugar. Stevia is great, but it won’t thicken the same way a sugar-based syrup will (which may or may not be a problem– a thinner syrup will mix well with drinks, but won’t be great on pancakes, etc.). Honey and heavier syrups like agave tend to separate from the water when chilled, resulting in an uneven syrup. Coconut sugar might be a possibility, I have never tried it… it’s worth a shot!

  3. What a great idea.
    Another use: I’ve been cutting up a stalk of rhubarb and including with my apples when making applesauce. Delicious.
    Francoise

    1. Hi Raygina, I have never canned this. I think it can be done, but I don’t have any specific canning instructions for you as I’m unsure of the acid content of rhubarb. According to the National Center for Home Food Preservation, stewed rhubarb (no sugar) needs 15 minutes in the boiling water bath or 8 in a pressure canner, more details here: link to nchfp.uga.edu. Not sure if the same guidelines apply to syrup. Here are my canning tutorials for more info:

      link to toriavey.com

      link to toriavey.com

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