How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs

How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.com

Not to “toot my own horn,” but I’ve been told on more than one occasion that I make the best scrambled eggs in the history of scrambled eggs. I’ve been refining my scrambling method since junior high school home economics class… do they even offer that class anymore?… where I first learned how to pull the cooking edges from the outside in (details below). This simple tip, along with a few others I’ve learned along the way, have developed into a foolproof method for a scrumptious scramble every time. We eat scrambled eggs almost every morning for breakfast, so I’ve had plenty time to refine the technique. I’m excited to share it with you!

“Everybody knows how to scramble eggs,” you might think. True, anybody can scramble eggs, but making a fluffy, moist scramble is a bit of an art form. I really loathe overcooked, rubbery or browned eggs. So many diners and delis serve them this way, which means I rarely go out for breakfast anymore. Why should I, when it’s perfectly easy (and way less expensive) to make tasty eggs at home? Here’s how!

Other Egg-cellent Recipe Ideas

How to Poach Eggs

Eggs in Hash Brown Nests from The Pioneer Woman

Nova Lox Benedict

Crustless Brie, Vegetable and Egg Bake from Recipe Girl

Mushroom, Harissa and Goat Cheese Frittata

How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.com

How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 1 tbsp whole milk
  • Shredded or crumbled cheese (optional)
  • Salt and pepper
  • Nonstick cooking oil spray, olive oil or butter, or a combination

You will also need

  • Bowl, fork or whisk, medium nonstick skillet
Total Time: 8 Minutes
Servings: 2
Kosher Key: Dairy
  • This recipe makes 2 servings, 2 eggs each (4 total), in a medium-sized nonstick skillet. In my experience 4 eggs tends to be the easiest to deal with in a standard medium-sized skillet and scrambles the most evenly. For a small skillet, try 2 eggs at a time. If you have a very large skillet (over 11"), try 6 at a time. Always use a skillet with a nonstick coating or a well-seasoned cast iron pan for best results.
  • Let's talk for a moment about egg quality. You can scramble any eggs and come out with a decent scramble, but if you want to take things to another level, make sure the chickens that laid your eggs were pasture-raised and given plenty of room to roam and forage. This leads to larger, tastier eggs with bright yellow, more nutritious yolks. Try checking out your local farmer's market, health food store or even a neighbor with chickens to see if you can score a deal on farm-fresh eggs from happy chickens.
  • If you plan on adding cheese to your eggs, make sure that the cheese is shredded/prepared and set aside so you can add to the skillet quickly. Place your skillet on the stovetop and turn on the heat to let it warm up. I leave the heat somewhere between medium low and medium, so it warms up but doesn't get too hot.
  • How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.comMeanwhile, prepare your eggs. Break them into a bowl with a splash of milk (about 1 tbsp for 4 eggs), some salt and pepper. I use about 1/8 tsp salt and a pinch of pepper; you might use more or less according to taste. If you're dairy intolerant you can omit the milk, but I love the way it enhances the flavor of the eggs so if you're okay with a splash of milk, use it.
  • How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.comUse a fork or whisk to beat the eggs briskly for 30-60 seconds, making sure the eggs are fully broken up and mixed well with the milk and the seasonings. Use a little elbow grease here, the more you whip it the better.
  • How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.comLightly grease your hot skillet, coating the surface with a thin layer of oil or butter (or a combination of oil and butter). If using spray oil, use caution and keep it away from any open gas flames.
  • How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.comPour the eggs into the skillet. Keep the heat on medium/medium low, you don't want to rush it here-- if the skillet is too hot the eggs will cook too quickly and become rubbery. Once you pour the eggs in they will begin to cook immediately. Using a spatula (I use a wooden spatula so I won't damage my nonstick coating), begin pulling the cooked outer edges in towards the center of the eggs. Uncooked eggs will flood the area you just pulled back. If you are adding cheese, now is the time to sprinkle it into the skillet. This will allow ample time for the cheese to melt and integrate into the eggs.
  • How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.comMove the spatula around the edge of the skillet, pulling the cooked edges towards the center and re-flooding repeatedly. Cooked scrambled eggs will gather in the center of the skillet.
  • How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.comAt a certain point, the uncooked eggs will no longer flood and the scramble will all collect in the center of the skillet, but it will still be slightly runny in texture. Begin breaking up the scramble; quickly turn undercooked areas and keep the scramble moving to make sure that all surfaces cook evenly. Never leave a surface in contact too long with the skillet or it will become overcooked.
  • How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.comTurn off the heat when the eggs are 90% cooked. When the eggs are done, serve immediately. Perfectly cooked scrambled eggs are moist but not runny, with no crisp or brown edges. This technique may take a bit of practice, but it is quite simple. With time you too will be making and serving moist, fluffy scrambled eggs!
  • How to Make Fluffy Moist Scrambled Eggs - Recipe tutorial for cooking flavorful and evenly cooked scrambled eggs every time on ToriAvey.com

Comments (50)Post a Comment

  1. Thanks so much for the tips, Tori! Love them. I learned quite a bit. You forgot to mention one thing, though. If you are using cheese, at what point do you add it, to avoid giving that curdled texture to the eggs?? Thanks!

    1. I find it interesting to see most of my neighbors have a dog that hangs out with the chickens during the day. I presume it’s for predator protection… the chickens don’t seem to consider the dogs anything but a big chicken lol. Once the chicken house is closed for the night, one lady tells me, the dog comes back to the house.

  2. That’s how I make scrambled eggs. Maybe it’s just intuitive. It’s been so long since my Home Ec class, I can’t remember how we were taught to do it. I just know that crispy, brown, dry, and/or rubbery scrambled eggs are inedible. So, have a little patience, cook them slowly, and you’ll attain perfection. The only thing I do differently is, instead of using pan spray, I throw a couple of tablespoons of butter into the pan as it’s preheating. Butter adds a delightful touch of flavor — to everything, come to think of it. And, now, I want breakfast! ;)

  3. That’s how I make omelettes, with eggs still warm from my girls, sometimes a goose, duck or guinea egg or three too, but use a splash of buttermilk instead of milk. When it’s 90% cooked I pop it under the grill in the oven, add toppings, mushrooms, cheese, chives as an example, and fold that baby on the plate :)

  4. Milk in scrambled eggs made me spit up as a child and makes me nauseated as an adult. I don’t know why. I can tell when someone has put milk in the scrambled eggs. Someone didn’t believe me and tried to trick me, but I knew. They were amazed. Well, having said that, one can also use plain water to make the eggs tender and moist. Follow the recipe on here but use water instead. Works great!

  5. Trick I leaned on trip to New Zealand. They call it “the Queen’s Eggs.” Instead of any other cheese, add a few dollops of cream cheese. Remarkable upgrade.

    1. Very good - 4 starsVery good - 4 starsVery good - 4 starsVery good - 4 starsVery good - 4 stars
      Experienced those eggs on a trip to NZ.
      They are absolutely my favorite. Easy to do with
      great result.

  6. Once I saw a tv program taught us to add in some spring onion/green onion to our scramble egg at the last stage since then I’m in love with it.

  7. Excellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 starsExcellent - 5 stars
    A spoonful of sour cream–I use Daisy as it is made from cream without additives–added to the eggs before they are beaten makes delicious scrambled eggs. I use a heaping teaspoon of it for 2-3 eggs and a rounded to heaped soup spoon full for 4-6 eggs. In France scrambled eggs are often made in a double boiler–use a stainless bowl or the IKEA double boiler rounded pot over a sauce pan of simmering water. The result is incredible! Or try this mind-bending recipe for POACHED scrambled eggs .

  8. for those who can’t/won’t use milk, use 1 T very cold water per egg and whip to a froth, then put in the skillet. The water steams the eggs and then evaporates and you get the most moist, fluffy eggs ever! :)

  9. Very good - 4 starsVery good - 4 starsVery good - 4 starsVery good - 4 starsVery good - 4 stars
    GREAT TIPS—-This is exactly how I prepare my eggs except I always use unsalted butter–This method was given a “thumbs up” from a former room mate of mine who was from Paris,France and was/is a “foodie”…She said this is how they do their “Omlets”, basically–and you know how picky (bossy-lol) French chefs usually are! So to see this “outside-in” technique is really a treat—THANKS SO MUCH! “Bon Appetite”

  10. Toda raba! I used your technique this morning with our farm fresh eggs, raw goat milk, and goat cheese . It made a healthy breakfast into a gourmet one!

  11. I usually use a splash of milk and a splash of water… but if I’m making Lox & eggs, I use cream cheese & a tiny bit of green onion. Tried your method of pulling into the middle. Perfect!

  12. I’ve perfected my eggs same way, moving to water to replace milk (or sometimes a bit of almond milk) but at end, since eggs r still cooking, as I turn off skillet at maybe 80% cooked since I use an iron skillet, then I fold the cooked bottom to the top of some less cooked eggs, keeps em really moist! My son likes to splash some evooil on at this point,

  13. I’ve heard a few times that people would like being served ”Breakfast” for any meal, morning, noon or night. Eggs prepared in any style; cheese of choice (if adding cheese in my eggs, I sprinkle grated Parmesan); potatoes in any style; bacon or a hearty slice of ham for those of us who enjoy it; buttered, toasted bread, bagels or muffins (rye, white, wheat, corn, bran); at least 2 choices of jam. And coffee.

  14. Another great way to make fluffy eggs is to cover the pan with a lid and cook on low. Simply add milk and pinch of salt to the scramble before pouring into the pan. It may take awhile to cook, but the results are excellent! Tip: grease the pan with butter, and stir minimally.

  15. Only two things you really need to remember. Cook at a very low temp and remove the eggs before they’re fully cooked. They’ll finish cooking while sitting on the plate.

    I use a pat of butter and some salt. I crack the eggs into the hot pan and let them set until the whites become opaque. At that point I break the yolks and give them just a little scamble. I like the look of the mixed white and yellow. If I am doing an omelette, I’ll put the eggs in a blender, but not for scrambled eggs. It makes your eggs look like they came from a factory.

    The size of the egg is largely determined by the age of the chicken. Young chickens do not lay jumbo eggs, free ranged or not.

    When a recipe asks for an egg and it doesn’t say what size, it’s asking for “large”.

    Whether a dozen eggs are classified as medium, large, jumbo, etc is determined by the weight of a dozen eggs, not by the size of each individual egg.

  16. I have William Shakespeare’s Omelette on DVD. I watched the whole thing and nobody ever made any eggs. Worst cooking DVD ever!

    Seriously, here’s a question that NOBODY has ever answered satisfactorily.

    How do you peel a hard boiled egg without destroying it, regardless of whether it’s an old or fresh egg?

    As an egg gets older, some of the moisture inside evaporates. That leaves a little pocket of air at the top. So if you put an old egg in water, it will should stand up vertically.

    Many people say the key to peeling a hard boiled egg is the egg must not be a fresh egg. I don’t see that as the problem.

    The best I’ve been able to determine is that you must peel the egg under hot water. Hot as you can stand.

    The other critical point is there’s a thin membrane between the shell and the egg. It’s absolutely imperative that you get your finger underneath the membrane. Pressing down on the soft white with the side of your thumb helps to get underneath the membrane. .

    Are there any other secrets out there that actually work…on old or fresh hard boiled eggs?

    You can buy packages of perfectly peeled hard boiled eggs in the grocery store so somebody must have figured this out. If they were old eggs they would have “flat tops” but the eggs appear to be fresh, id est,, perfectly oval.

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