Roasted Carrots with Dill

Roasted Carrots with Dill - Simple Springtime Side Dish Recipe by Tori Avey

In recent years, as farmers and gardeners have worked to revitalize heirloom vegetables, it’s not uncommon to see carrots in shades of yellow, white and even purple. At one time, the orange color we associate with carrots didn’t even exist. Some historians believe that during the 17th century, the Dutch cultivated the orange carrot as way of honoring William of Orange, who led the Dutch revolt against Spain. Years later, when the Dutch Patriot movement rebelled against the House of Orange, the carrot was seen as an offensive homage to the monarchy. The orange color, a result of crossing a number of different varieties and colors of carrots, comes from carotene. A diet heavy in carrots can sometimes give the skin a yellowish tint. This harmless condition, known as carotenemia, is a result of these carotene pigments and will go away on its own after a week without carrots.

Roasting carrots has a truly magical effect on their flavor. Kosher salt brings out their natural sweetness and fresh dill is the perfect springtime flavor pairing. This healthy and delicious side dish takes barely any time at all. When the roasted carrots are laid out on a platter it makes for a pretty and rustic presentation. Bonus– they’re kosher for Passover! If you see me turning yellow, never fear. I’m so addicted to these roasted carrots that I might well come down with a case of carotenemia.

Roasted Carrots with Dill - Simple Springtime Side Dish Recipe by Tori Avey

Roasted Carrots with Dill

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs whole carrots (I prefer young medium-sized carrots with greens still attached)
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp freshly chopped dill
  • Kosher salt and pepper to taste

You will also need

  • sheet tray, tongs, nonstick cooking oil spray
Cook Time: 40 Minutes
Servings: 6 servings
Kosher Key: Pareve
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Clean and remove the tops from the carrots.
  • Roasted Carrots with Dill - Simple Springtime Side Dish Recipe by Tori AveyPlace the carrots on a greased sheet tray and drizzle with the olive oil. Toss with your hands to make sure they are evenly covered in oil. Sprinkle with kosher salt and pepper.
  • Roasted Carrots with Dill - Simple Springtime Side Dish Recipe by Tori AveyRoast the carrots for 20 minutes, then remove from the oven and turn the carrots with tongs. Sprinkle with 1 tbsp freshly chopped dill and roast for an additional 20 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven, place carrots on a platter. Sprinkle with remaining 1 tbsp of fresh dill. Serve immediately.
  • Roasted Carrots with Dill - Simple Springtime Side Dish Recipe by Tori Avey

Comments (58)Post a Comment

  1. What carrot today do you think is closest to the “original” carrot? And when you roast them, do you put butter on them and whatever herb is fascinating you at the moment? Also, I know there are actually many colors of carrots, I’ve seen seed packages, does the color have anything to do with the flavor? Which is better?

    1. Hi Karen, the purple heirloom varieties are probably most similar to the “original” carrot, though white and yellow ones occurred naturally in the wild as well. Click through to read the recipe for roasting; you can add butter, but you don’t really need to. Olive oil and kosher salt produce a buttery flavor. Lots of fresh herbs would work well here- rosemary, parsley, thyme. The flavors of various heirloom varieties (the colors you see) are all quite similar and carroty; there may be slight variations between them, but not very noticeable. You can sub any color carrot you like here, or a few different colors to give it a rainbow effect! :)

  2. Quick question—how can you tell if they are “young carrots”? I’d like to make this, but I’m thinking the carrots from the store will need to be peeled first. Does that seem right? (I’m terrible at cooking, but trying to get better, haha…)

    1. Hi Amanda! Most grocery stores carry young carrots– they’re a bit smaller than full-grown carrots and they usually have the green leafy tops attached. They have a thinner skin and don’t need to be peeled before roasting; they also tend to be more flavorful, in my experience.

  3. Purple and extra-red carrots have a super-abundance of beta-carotene. And cooking makes beta carotene more accessible to the body,especially in the presence of a fat(so a little olive oil on the carrots prior to roasting would be great). Delicious!

  4. i always make roasted carrots & parsnips ! YUMMY…just the other day-made roasted veggies–red potatoes/shallots/garlic/carrots/parsnips/white potatoes/onions SO GOOD !!!!!

  5. Any root vegetable is wonderful after roasting. I like to use radishes/parsnips/turnips/beets/onions/carrots/potatoes/egg-
    plant/tomatoes/cloves of garlic left in the peel.

    Wash everything really well, cut up the bigger pieces. Dry everything, then put in a large bowl/pot add enough olive oil to be able to evenly coat all veggies, then add the seasonings and mix up again.

    Put a sheet of parchment paper on the baking sheet before dumping the container onto the baking sheet, then roast.

  6. roasted carrots are WONDERFUL, i usually sprinkle on a little black pepper, will try dill soon. thank you for showing a pan that has been used and continues to be used. it feels like home.

  7. I’ve made this recipe a few times. It always tastes good, but it comes out looking nothing like the pictures you posted. Mine have a dark line (where the carrot sits on top of the baking sheet). I’ve tried it with parchment paper and without.. Same results..

    1. Jason– do you flip the carrots halfway through? They should be slightly browned/golden where they touch the baking sheet, but not super dark if you turn them during cooking. Also try putting the sheet in the center of the oven instead of the top or bottom, to provide more even heat distribution.

  8. WOW! This recipe is a complete winner! everyone in my family likes this recipe, even my extremely picky 6 year old! I make it every Shabbos now (and also a few times during the week!). Thanks for the idea.

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